PLEASE BE ADVISED - THE CMPC CANNOT ACCEPT ANY FURTHER PROPOSALS AT THIS TIME AS FUNDS FOR THE NEXT TWO FINANCIAL YEARS (01/04/12 - 31/03/13 and 01/04/13 - 31/03/14) HAVE ALREADY BEEN ALLOCATED.

If you have a project that starts after 1 April 2014 then we will be happy to consider your proposal.

OVERVIEW

The development of a fundamental understanding of materials is a naturally interdisciplinary endeavour. Knowledge may be built from the fundamental physics and chemistry of inter-atomic interactions through statistical mechanics to the technologically and environmentally important properties of interest to material scientists, geologists and engineers. Over the past decade there have been very significant developments in techniques for the atomic scale characterisation of materials. A combination of the use of neutron, X-ray and electron scattering, the introduction of scanning probe microscopies and the ability to apply predictive simulation techniques to realistic models of materials give unprecedented access to the atomistic mechanisms underpinning material properties. STFC and its collaborators are uniquely positioned to make a world-leading contribution to the fundamental understanding of materials science. We have unrivalled expertise in the development and application of neutron and X-ray scattering and in materials simulation. The centre for materials science will draw together these skills in a coordinated programme of ambitious scientific projects designed to fully exploit and extend our opportunities in materials science.

The short and medium term output of the centre is described in the thematic programmes. In the long term the combination of skills available is capable of producing a paradigm shift in the way that new materials are generated and characterised. For instance, STFC will be able to take a leading role in the development of methods of rational design where the fundamental understanding of the relationship between composition, structure and properties is used to generate materials for specific functions.